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The Ramblings of a Trainee Egyptologist

A masters student's journey through the world of Ancient Egypt, Ancient History and Academia.

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This WordPress “The Ramblings of a Trainee Egyptologist” is a part of my journey as a masters student (MA in Ancient History to be specific), I started this primarily to pull together all the resources that I had found over my four years of tertiary study so far, which made me think someone else might find this useful – so if it is, go for it, it is all together under resources! From there the idea grew, and I imagine it will continue to.

So there is the news tab where I have collected together news articles and blog posts about current goings on in the fields of Egyptology, Ancient History, Archaeology and Academia.

Then there are my rambles, such as this one, which are part of recording my journey through the world of Ancient Egypt, Ancient History and Academia. It includes everything and anything remotely related to Egypt, Egyptology, Archaeology, Ancient History and being a Masters student. I imagine that it will include, by the end of the two years, everything I could possibly encounter on my travels through this degree.

Finally, The Mishmash brings this all together as one jumble of a journey from start to now, because the word finish doesn’t quite seem right.

So join me, if you will, as I stumble through it all – learn from my mistakes and make sure to study something you love!

mxx

Featured post

via Fragments of Thutmose I Temple Discovered in Storage – Archaeology Magazine

Examining the inscriptions of ancient tourists in the tomb of Ramesses VI – The Archaeology News Network

“I visited and I did not like anything except the sarcophagus!”; “I admired!” “I cannot read the hieroglyphs!” – these are some of the inscriptions read by the Polish scientists working inside Egypt’s pharaoh Ramesses VI in the Valley of the Kings. All inscriptions were left by tourists who visited this place about 2,000 years ago!

via Examining the inscriptions of ancient tourists in the tomb of Ramesses VI – The Archaeology News Network

via Egypt’s sunken antiquities threatened by ship waste – The Archaeology News Network

via Al-Maala necropolis site in Upper Egypt documented – The Archaeology News Network

Short Ramble on Times HE article on reasons behind lack of change in teaching practice

Just a short ramble today – I read this article from THE titled “Academics ‘fail to change teaching due to fear of looking stupid.’” This title grabbed my attention straight away. As a “potential” academic the research-teaching-service nexus along with the measurable university fascinates, and, if I am being totally honest, scares me. It is a really interesting read especially seeing what impact measurability, such as student surveys and their connection to promotion, along with multiple other factors has had an impact on the development and experimentation in teaching practice in this study. I recommend having a read!

“An anthropologist who had the unenviable task of sitting through academics’ meetings and reading their email chains to find out why they fail to change their teaching styles has come to a surprising conclusion: lecturers are simply too afraid of looking stupid in front of their students to try something new.”

via Academics ‘fail to change teaching due to fear of looking stupid’ | Times Higher Education (THE)

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Ancient Egyptian gold workers’ tomb excavated in northern Sudan – The Archaeology News Network

The primarily German research team said that the tomb contained the remains of over one dozen individuals, several of whom were mummified, and wooden coffins although their burial sites were not well preserved.

According to Julia Budka, professor of Egyptian archaeology and art history at Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich and the excavation’s chief archaeologist, the tomb was built for a man identified as Khnummose. He is said to have been a master gold worker, and an unidentified woman thought to be his wife was buried by his side.

The other remains, believed to belong to those who lived and worked on Sai Island as gold manufacturers, were found in the tomb’s other chambers.

via Ancient Egyptian gold workers’ tomb excavated in northern Sudan – The Archaeology News Network

via Rare rock inscriptions discovered near El-Khawy – HeritageDaily – Heritage & Archaeology News

via Ancient Graffiti on Egyptian Tomb Walls Studied – Archaeology Magazine

via Archaeologists discover earliest monumental Egyptian hieroglyphs – The Archaeology News Network

Scientists Re-Examine Ancient Prosthetic Toe – Archaeology Magazine

According to a report in Swiss Info, researchers from the University of Basel, the University of Zurich, and the Egyptian Museum in Cairo re-examined a 3,000-year-old prosthetic toe discovered in Egypt’s Sheikh ‘Abd el-Qurna necropolis with modern imaging techniques, including microscopy, X-ray technology, and computed tomography. The prosthesis belonged to the daughter of a priest whose big right toe appears to have been amputated. The wooden toe had been refitted several times. “They often wore sandals, so you can imagine that a well-formed foot was important,” said Andrea Loprieno-Gnirs of the University of Basel. “The wooden toe shows that she had a certain living standard, and also that there were craftsmen capable of making such prosthetics.”

via Scientists Re-Examine Ancient Prosthetic Toe – Archaeology Magazine

via Ancient DNA reveals role of Near East and Egypt in cat domestication – HeritageDaily – Heritage & Archaeology News

via Archaeologist teams up with computer vision experts to match prehistoric pottery – The Archaeology News Network

A Pharaoh’s Massive Tomb Unveiled | Popular Archaeology – exploring the past

The tomb of King Senwosret III, one of the most renowned pharaohs of ancient Egypt’s Middle Kingdom, is expected to open to the public in about a year or two, allowing tourists to appreciate the architecture of Egyptian builders who constructed the burial complex almost four thousand years ago, according to Dr. Josef Wegner, Associate Curator of the Egyptian Section of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (Penn Museum). He has been excavating in Abydos for decades.

via A Pharaoh’s Massive Tomb Unveiled | Popular Archaeology – exploring the past

via Hellenistic Burials Uncovered in Alexandria – Archaeology Magazine

The foundations of a luxurious private bath house once owned by some of the richest citizens of Roman Chichester have been found under a public park in the centre of the city.

via Luxury bath house from Roman Chichester unearthed by archaeologists | UK news | The Guardian

4000-year-old red granite lintel discovered at Egypt’s Herakleopolis Magna – The Archaeology News Network

Dr. Mahmoud Afifi, Head of the Ancient Egyptian Antiquities Sector at the Ministry of Antiquities, who announced the discovery, said the lintel is engraved with two cartouches containing the name of the Middle Kingdom King Sesostris II, (ca. 1895 – 1889 BC), who built the Lahun pyramid located some 10km from Ihnasya.

via 4000-year-old red granite lintel discovered at Egypt’s Herakleopolis Magna – The Archaeology News Network

A vivid, turquoise-colored carving from ancient Egypt has been returned to a Berlin museum more than 70 years after it was thought to have been lost during World War II.

via Lost Since World War II, Egyptian Artifact Returns to Germany

England Returns Artifacts to Egypt – Archaeology Magazine

Officials in London have handed over four artifacts thought to have been smuggled out of Egypt, according to a report in Ahram Online. Shaaban Abdel-Gawad, head of the Antiquities Ministry’s Antiquities Repatriation Department, said the objects include a glass sculpture of a human head, a stone relief thought to have been taken in the 1970s from Hatshepsut’s temple, a wooden ushabti figurine, and a Roman-era object from Minya. All of the objects except for the carving taken from Hatshepsut’s temple are thought to have been stolen from Egyptian galleries in the aftermath of the 2011 revolution.

via England Returns Artifacts to Egypt – Archaeology Magazine

4,000-Year-Old Paintings Revealed on Egyptian Tomb Walls – Archaeology Magazine

4,000-year-old tombs excavated more than 100 years ago in the Beni Hassan cemetery have been cleaned and conserved by a team from Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities. A team led by Linda Evans of Macquarie University’s Australian Centre for Egyptology then surveyed the tombs using modern techniques. The effort has revealed scenes on the walls that were not recorded during the initial investigation, and clarified other images, including one of an Egyptian mongoose wearing a collar and walking on a leash on the wall of a tomb occupied by Baqet I, a governor during the 11th Dynasty. Evans noted that the person walking the mongoose also holds the leash of a spotted hunting dog. Although mongooses were not fully domesticated, Evans suggests they may have been kept as pets to control pests such as snakes, rats, and mice. Or, they may have been employed by hunters to flush birds from cover.

via 4,000-Year-Old Paintings Revealed on Egyptian Tomb Walls – Archaeology Magazine

The first genome data from ancient Egyptian mummies – The Archaeology News Network

The study, published in Nature Communications, found that modern Egyptians share more ancestry with Sub-Saharan Africans than ancient Egyptians did, whereas ancient Egyptians were found to be most closely related to ancient people from the Near East.

via The first genome data from ancient Egyptian mummies – The Archaeology News Network

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