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The Ramblings of a Trainee Egyptologist

A masters student's journey through the world of Ancient Egypt, Ancient History and Academia.

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tomb

Examining the inscriptions of ancient tourists in the tomb of Ramesses VI – The Archaeology News Network

“I visited and I did not like anything except the sarcophagus!”; “I admired!” “I cannot read the hieroglyphs!” – these are some of the inscriptions read by the Polish scientists working inside Egypt’s pharaoh Ramesses VI in the Valley of the Kings. All inscriptions were left by tourists who visited this place about 2,000 years ago!

via Examining the inscriptions of ancient tourists in the tomb of Ramesses VI – The Archaeology News Network

via Al-Maala necropolis site in Upper Egypt documented – The Archaeology News Network

Ancient Egyptian gold workers’ tomb excavated in northern Sudan – The Archaeology News Network

The primarily German research team said that the tomb contained the remains of over one dozen individuals, several of whom were mummified, and wooden coffins although their burial sites were not well preserved.

According to Julia Budka, professor of Egyptian archaeology and art history at Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich and the excavation’s chief archaeologist, the tomb was built for a man identified as Khnummose. He is said to have been a master gold worker, and an unidentified woman thought to be his wife was buried by his side.

The other remains, believed to belong to those who lived and worked on Sai Island as gold manufacturers, were found in the tomb’s other chambers.

via Ancient Egyptian gold workers’ tomb excavated in northern Sudan – The Archaeology News Network

via Ancient Graffiti on Egyptian Tomb Walls Studied – Archaeology Magazine

A Pharaoh’s Massive Tomb Unveiled | Popular Archaeology – exploring the past

The tomb of King Senwosret III, one of the most renowned pharaohs of ancient Egypt’s Middle Kingdom, is expected to open to the public in about a year or two, allowing tourists to appreciate the architecture of Egyptian builders who constructed the burial complex almost four thousand years ago, according to Dr. Josef Wegner, Associate Curator of the Egyptian Section of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (Penn Museum). He has been excavating in Abydos for decades.

via A Pharaoh’s Massive Tomb Unveiled | Popular Archaeology – exploring the past

via Hellenistic Burials Uncovered in Alexandria – Archaeology Magazine

4,000-Year-Old Paintings Revealed on Egyptian Tomb Walls – Archaeology Magazine

4,000-year-old tombs excavated more than 100 years ago in the Beni Hassan cemetery have been cleaned and conserved by a team from Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities. A team led by Linda Evans of Macquarie University’s Australian Centre for Egyptology then surveyed the tombs using modern techniques. The effort has revealed scenes on the walls that were not recorded during the initial investigation, and clarified other images, including one of an Egyptian mongoose wearing a collar and walking on a leash on the wall of a tomb occupied by Baqet I, a governor during the 11th Dynasty. Evans noted that the person walking the mongoose also holds the leash of a spotted hunting dog. Although mongooses were not fully domesticated, Evans suggests they may have been kept as pets to control pests such as snakes, rats, and mice. Or, they may have been employed by hunters to flush birds from cover.

via 4,000-Year-Old Paintings Revealed on Egyptian Tomb Walls – Archaeology Magazine

via Ten Late Period Tombs Discovered in Aswan – Archaeology Magazine

Compelling evidence for future tomb discoveries at Qubbet el-Hawa in Aswan – Past Horizons

Archaeologists from the University of Birmingham have found “compelling evidence” of new pharaonic tombs at Qubbet el-Hawa in Aswan, Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities has revealed.

via Compelling evidence for future tomb discoveries at Qubbet el-Hawa in Aswan – Past Horizons

via Amun-Ra Egyptology Blog: Beni Sweif tombs to open

Exclusive footage: Ancient Egyptian tombs open to public for the first time – Luxor Times Magazine

via Exclusive footage: Ancient Egyptian tombs open to public for the first time – Luxor Times Magazine

The Archaeology News Network: 18th Dynasty tombs found in Egypt’s Aswan

3,400-Year-Old Necropolis Found in Egypt : Discovery News

Scans of King Tut’s Tomb Reveal New Evidence of Hidden Rooms

For at least 3,339 years, nobody has seen what lies behind the west and north walls of the burial chamber of Tutankhamun.  But this secret of three millennia might not last much longer.

On Thursday, Mamdouh Eldamaty, the Egyptian antiquities minister, held a press conference in Cairo to announce a tantalizing new piece of evidence:  Radar scans on those walls have revealed not only the presence of hidden chambers, but also unidentified objects that lie within these rooms. These objects, Eldamaty said, seem to be composed of both metal and organic materials.

via Scans of King Tut’s Tomb Reveal New Evidence of Hidden Rooms – The National Geographic.

The Archaeology News Network: Sudan excavations reveal Egyptian, Nubian ‘cultural entanglement’

In a middle-class tomb just east of the Nile River in what was Upper Nubia, a woman offers a glimpse of how two met civilizations met, mingled and a new pharaonic dynasty arose. Her tomb was Egyptian, but she was buried in the Nubian style — placed in a flexed position on her side and resting on a bed. Around her neck she wore amulets of the Egyptian god Bes, the protector of households.

via The Archaeology News Network: Sudan excavations reveal Egyptian, Nubian ‘cultural entanglement’.

Amun-Ra Egyptology Blog: Egyptian Middle Kingdom tomb discovered at El-Lisht.

The Archaeology News Network: Tomb of one of the most ancient royal pyramids at Meroe reopened.

Image: Subterranean burial chambers of Queen Khennuwa at Meroe  [Credit: P. Wolf/DAI]

Thracian Burial Mound Excavated – Archaeology Magazine.

“It is full of treasures … the discovery of the 21st century.” — NILE Magazine.

Amun-Ra Egyptology Blog: Revelations in the Valley of the Kings: what has been found since King Tut’s coffin?.

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