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The Ramblings of a Trainee Egyptologist

A masters student's journey through the world of Ancient Egypt, Ancient History and Academia.

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Egypt

Hieratic Continued

In February last year, I introduced my foray into hieratic as “Squiggle, line, ink splodge…” and I noted that I found it surprising after 3 years of Middle and Late Egyptian that it was hard to engage with. A year on, Continue reading “Hieratic Continued”

Great Pyramid of Giza found to be slightly lopsided – The Archaeology News Network

The Great Pyramid of Giza is one of the most impressive structures in the world, but it also has a small design flaw. It’s lopsided. The good news? That flaw could help us figure out how humans managed to build such a complicated structure with only simple tools.

via Great Pyramid of Giza found to be slightly lopsided – The Archaeology News Network

AWOL – The Ancient World Online: Date Converter for Ancient Egypt

This website is a scientific tool for converting calendar dates mentioned in Greek and Demotic papyri from Egypt into Julian and corresponding Gregorian dates, from the reign of Psametik to Diocletian.

via AWOL – The Ancient World Online: Date Converter for Ancient Egypt

Egyptian Spells Deciphered – Archaeology Magazine

Two newly deciphered papyri from Egypt dating to the third century A.D. contain spells that deal with love and control, according to a report from Discovery News.

via Egyptian Spells Deciphered – Archaeology Magazine

AWOL – The Ancient World Online: Partially Open Access Journal: Bulletin de la Société d’Égyptologie, Genève

Drowned worlds: Egypt’s lost cities | Art and design | The Guardian

Early Egyptian Queen Revealed in 5,000-Year-Old Hieroglyphs

The inscriptions carved by a mining expedition show that queen Neith-Hotep stepped up as ruler about 5,000 years ago, millennia before Hatshepsut or Cleopatra VII ruled the country.

While Egyptologists knew that Neith-Hotep existed, they believed she was married to a pharaoh named Narmer. “The inscriptions demonstrate that she [Neith-Hotep] was not the wife of Narmer, but a regent queen at the beginning of the reign of Djer,” Tallet said.

via Early Egyptian Queen Revealed in 5,000-Year-Old Hieroglyphs

Small Egyptian Sarcophagus Receives CT Scan – Archaeology Magazine

Egyptologists at the Fitzwilliam Museum reportedly expected to find the embalmed remains of an adult’s organs in a miniature cedar sarcophagus that was discovered in Giza in 1907 by the British School of Archaeology. However, a CT scan has revealed the remains of a human fetus, estimated to have been no more than 18 weeks old at the time of death, which occurred sometime between 664 and 525 B.C. “The care taken in the preparation of this burial clearly demonstrates the value placed on life even in the first weeks of its inception,” Julie Dawson, head of conservation at the museum, told The Telegraph. The small-scale coffin had been carefully decorated, and the remains inside it had been wrapped in bandages. Molten black resin was poured over the tiny mummy before the coffin was closed. To read about another recent discovery, go to “Egypt’s Immigrant Elite.”

via Small Egyptian Sarcophagus Receives CT Scan – Archaeology Magazine

Exclusive footage: Ancient Egyptian tombs open to public for the first time – Luxor Times Magazine

via Exclusive footage: Ancient Egyptian tombs open to public for the first time – Luxor Times Magazine

Possible ancient sanctuary of Nectanebo I and temple of Ramses II discovered in Matariya Egypt – HeritageDaily – Heritage & Archaeology News

THE EGYPTIAN-GERMAN ARCHAEOLOGICAL MISSION TO MATARIYA HAS DISCOVERED NEW EVIDENCE FOR A SANCTUARY OF NEKTANEBO I (380-363 BC) IN THE TEMPLE PRECINCT OF HELIOPOLIS.

Nectanebo was an army general from Sebennytos who became Pharaoh and founder of the last native dynasty of Egypt, the thirtieth. Nectanebo was a great builder and restorer, to an extent not seen in Egypt for centuries.

The mission has discovered a number of blocks that has enabled them to visualise the layout of the ancient structure…

Researchers from the University of Leipzig/Germany have also uncovered a workshop dating from the 4th century BC in the south-east of the temple precinct as well as a new possible temple site of Ramses II, evident by fragments of a colossal statuary and large blocks with wall relief.

via Possible ancient sanctuary of Nectanebo I and temple of Ramses II discovered in Matariya Egypt – HeritageDaily – Heritage & Archaeology News

Image: “The Egyptian-German Archaeological Mission to Matariya has discovered new evidence for a sanctuary of Nektanebo I (380-363 BC) in the temple precinct of Heliopolis.” Sourced from http://www.heritagedaily.com/2016/05/possible-ancient-sanctuary-of-nectanebo-i-and-temple-of-ramses-ii-discovered-in-matariya-egy/111054. Credit to Ministry of Antiquities

Intricate animal and flower tattoos found on Egyptian mummy – The Archaeology News Network

A mummy from ancient Egypt was heavily tattooed with sacred symbols, which may have served to advertise and enhance the religious powers of the woman who received them more than 3,000 years ago.

via Intricate animal and flower tattoos found on Egyptian mummy – The Archaeology News Network

3,700-Year-Old Egyptian Seal Discovered at Tel Dor – Archaeology Magazine

A birdwatcher visiting Tel Dor last winter discovered an Egyptian scarab brought to the surface by heavy rains. According to a report in The Times of Israel, the seal is thought to have belonged to an official from the Thirteenth Dynasty, dating back to the eighteenth century B.C. “The scarab belonged to a very senior figure in the kingdom, probably the viceroy responsible for the royal treasury,” said Ayelet Gilboa of the University of Haifa. Researchers think the scarab may have been carried to northern Israel by the viceroy or his representative, or it may have arrived at the site later, during the Roman period, when there was a demand for Egyptian artifacts.

via 3,700-Year-Old Egyptian Seal Discovered at Tel Dor – Archaeology Magazine

Barque station of Queen Hatshepsut discovered on Elephantine Island – Amun-Ra Egyptology Blog

Ancient Egyptian Antiquities Sector Dr. Mahmoud Afify declared the discovery of a number of blocks that most probably belong to a previously unknown building of Queen Hatshepsut that was discovered this year by the German Archaeological Institute on the Island of Elephantine, Aswan.

via Barque station of Queen Hatshepsut discovered on Elephantine Island – Amun-Ra Egyptology Blog

Ancient statues unearthed on Aswan’s Elephantine Island – The Archaeology News Network

A Swiss excavation mission led by Swiss archaeologist Cornelius Pilgrim unearthed two headless statues and an offering stele during excavation works within the vicinity of Khnum temple on the Nile island of Elephantine in Aswan.

via Ancient statues unearthed on Aswan’s Elephantine Island – The Archaeology News Network

Egyptian statues from lost city are a tall order for British Museum | Culture | The Guardian

Part of the ceiling of the British Museum’s new exhibition space has had to be dismantled to allow the safe installation of three colossal Egyptian granite statues, which were recovered in 2001 from the water where they lay for more than 2,000 years since a wealthy harbour city was destroyed by earthquake and rising sea levels.

via Egyptian statues from lost city are a tall order for British Museum | Culture | The Guardian

Finally: photography in Luxor museum – Luxor TImes

After the successful trial period to allow non-flash photography in the Egyptian museum in Cairo which was announced by the former minister of antiquities, Dr. Mamdouh El-Damaty, in August for the period from 1st of December 2015 till 7th of January 2016.

The minister took the bold decision to encourage tourists to visit the museum which proved success.

On his visit to Luxor museum in early February, Luxor Times asked Dr. Mamdouh El-Damaty, when photography will be allowed in Luxor museum and immediately the minister called Dr. Elham Salah (head of museums sector) and told her “That’s a valid suggestion and we should work on it.”
Dr. Elham responded that it is planned to allow photography in Luxor Museum and soon in all museums in Egypt.

The idea became a reality a few days ago when Luxor museum allowed photography with no flash for a ticket for 50 Egyptian pounds.

via Finally: photography in Luxor museum – Luxor Times

The Archaeology News Network: 18th Dynasty tombs found in Egypt’s Aswan

AWOL – The Ancient World Online: Articles Published in the UCLA Encyclopedia of Egyptology in the past 12 months

3,400-Year-Old Necropolis Found in Egypt : Discovery News

via From Stonehenge to Nefertiti: how high-tech archaeology is transforming our view of history – HeritageDaily – Heritage & Archaeology News.

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