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The Ramblings of a Trainee Egyptologist

A masters student's journey through the world of Ancient Egypt, Ancient History and Academia.

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archaeology

The foundations of a luxurious private bath house once owned by some of the richest citizens of Roman Chichester have been found under a public park in the centre of the city.

via Luxury bath house from Roman Chichester unearthed by archaeologists | UK news | The Guardian

Scientists Measure the Great Pyramid of Giza – Archaeology Magazine

Engineer Glen Dash of the Glen Dash Research Foundation and Egyptologist Mark Lehner of Ancient Egypt Research Associates (AERA) took new measurements of the Great Pyramid of Giza to try to determine its original size and orientation. The 4,500-year-old pyramid, constructed for the pharaoh Khufu, is the largest of the three pyramids on the Giza Plateau, but most of its smooth limestone casing was removed and reused in antiquity. The scientists looked for surviving casing stones on the pyramid’s platform, and marks that suggest where the edges of the casing stones once rested. They found 84 points along the original edges and marked them on a grid system developed by AERA to map the Giza Plateau. Statistical analysis of the new measurements indicate the west side is longer than the east by between 0.25 and 5.6 inches to a 95% probability, with the best estimate of the error being 2.9 inches. “The base is not quite square,” Dash told Live Science. He suspects that the pyramid builders laid the structure out on a grid oriented on the cardinal directions, with just a slight degree of error. Additional research could reveal how the ancient Egyptians accomplished this feat.

via Scientists Measure the Great Pyramid of Giza – Archaeology Magazine

Roman mosaic unearthed in wheat field in Central Turkey – The Archaeology News Network

A Roman-era mosaic, estimated to date back to the 2nd century, has been unearthed in Turkey’s Central Anatolian province of Kırıkkale’s Delice district.

The excavation field appeared last year after rainfall in a wheat field in the village of Elmalı and the 48-centimeter mosaic was discovered there.

via Roman mosaic unearthed in wheat field in Central Turkey – The Archaeology News Network

Database of Scotland’s ancient rock art to be created – The Archaeology News Network

About 6,000 rocks are known in Britain to have ancient cup and ring carvings. More than 2,000 of the sites are found in Scotland.

Historic Environment Scotland (HES) has been awarded £807,000 by the Arts and Humanities Research Council towards the five-year project.

The database would include 2D and 3D models of some of the decorated stone.

via Database of Scotland’s ancient rock art to be created – The Archaeology News Network

Drowned worlds: Egypt’s lost cities | Art and design | The Guardian

Early Egyptian Queen Revealed in 5,000-Year-Old Hieroglyphs

The inscriptions carved by a mining expedition show that queen Neith-Hotep stepped up as ruler about 5,000 years ago, millennia before Hatshepsut or Cleopatra VII ruled the country.

While Egyptologists knew that Neith-Hotep existed, they believed she was married to a pharaoh named Narmer. “The inscriptions demonstrate that she [Neith-Hotep] was not the wife of Narmer, but a regent queen at the beginning of the reign of Djer,” Tallet said.

via Early Egyptian Queen Revealed in 5,000-Year-Old Hieroglyphs

Possible ancient sanctuary of Nectanebo I and temple of Ramses II discovered in Matariya Egypt – HeritageDaily – Heritage & Archaeology News

THE EGYPTIAN-GERMAN ARCHAEOLOGICAL MISSION TO MATARIYA HAS DISCOVERED NEW EVIDENCE FOR A SANCTUARY OF NEKTANEBO I (380-363 BC) IN THE TEMPLE PRECINCT OF HELIOPOLIS.

Nectanebo was an army general from Sebennytos who became Pharaoh and founder of the last native dynasty of Egypt, the thirtieth. Nectanebo was a great builder and restorer, to an extent not seen in Egypt for centuries.

The mission has discovered a number of blocks that has enabled them to visualise the layout of the ancient structure…

Researchers from the University of Leipzig/Germany have also uncovered a workshop dating from the 4th century BC in the south-east of the temple precinct as well as a new possible temple site of Ramses II, evident by fragments of a colossal statuary and large blocks with wall relief.

via Possible ancient sanctuary of Nectanebo I and temple of Ramses II discovered in Matariya Egypt – HeritageDaily – Heritage & Archaeology News

Image: “The Egyptian-German Archaeological Mission to Matariya has discovered new evidence for a sanctuary of Nektanebo I (380-363 BC) in the temple precinct of Heliopolis.” Sourced from http://www.heritagedaily.com/2016/05/possible-ancient-sanctuary-of-nectanebo-i-and-temple-of-ramses-ii-discovered-in-matariya-egy/111054. Credit to Ministry of Antiquities

Intricate animal and flower tattoos found on Egyptian mummy – The Archaeology News Network

A mummy from ancient Egypt was heavily tattooed with sacred symbols, which may have served to advertise and enhance the religious powers of the woman who received them more than 3,000 years ago.

via Intricate animal and flower tattoos found on Egyptian mummy – The Archaeology News Network

Site of Jacobite last stand laser-scanned – The Archaeology News Network

Archaeologists from the National Trust for Scotland (NTS), which manages what is one of Scottish history’s the most iconic sites, are using cutting-edge, laser scanning, technology to provide a detailed model of the battlefield of Culloden.

via Site of Jacobite last stand laser-scanned – The Archaeology News Network

3,700-Year-Old Egyptian Seal Discovered at Tel Dor – Archaeology Magazine

A birdwatcher visiting Tel Dor last winter discovered an Egyptian scarab brought to the surface by heavy rains. According to a report in The Times of Israel, the seal is thought to have belonged to an official from the Thirteenth Dynasty, dating back to the eighteenth century B.C. “The scarab belonged to a very senior figure in the kingdom, probably the viceroy responsible for the royal treasury,” said Ayelet Gilboa of the University of Haifa. Researchers think the scarab may have been carried to northern Israel by the viceroy or his representative, or it may have arrived at the site later, during the Roman period, when there was a demand for Egyptian artifacts.

via 3,700-Year-Old Egyptian Seal Discovered at Tel Dor – Archaeology Magazine

via Roman Forts around Hadrian’s Wall – Interactive Map – HeritageDaily – Heritage & Archaeology News

Barque station of Queen Hatshepsut discovered on Elephantine Island – Amun-Ra Egyptology Blog

Ancient Egyptian Antiquities Sector Dr. Mahmoud Afify declared the discovery of a number of blocks that most probably belong to a previously unknown building of Queen Hatshepsut that was discovered this year by the German Archaeological Institute on the Island of Elephantine, Aswan.

via Barque station of Queen Hatshepsut discovered on Elephantine Island – Amun-Ra Egyptology Blog

Ancient statues unearthed on Aswan’s Elephantine Island – The Archaeology News Network

A Swiss excavation mission led by Swiss archaeologist Cornelius Pilgrim unearthed two headless statues and an offering stele during excavation works within the vicinity of Khnum temple on the Nile island of Elephantine in Aswan.

via Ancient statues unearthed on Aswan’s Elephantine Island – The Archaeology News Network

Digital modelling of human skull from Culloden – HeritageDaily – Heritage & Archaeology News

THE TOP SECTION OF A SKULL OF WHAT IS THOUGHT TO BE SOMEONE WHO MET THEIR DEMISE ON THE BATTLEFIELD HAS BEEN ON DISPLAY AT THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS OF EDINBURGH’S HALL MUSEUMS IN NICOLSON STREET FOR MANY YEARS.

A digital 3D model of the skull has been created using overlapping digital photography.

via Digital modelling of human skull from Culloden – HeritageDaily – Heritage & Archaeology News

3,400-Year-Old Necropolis Found in Egypt : Discovery News

via From Stonehenge to Nefertiti: how high-tech archaeology is transforming our view of history – HeritageDaily – Heritage & Archaeology News.

Viking Crucifix Found in Denmark – Archaeology Magazine

A rare Viking-era gold crucifix has been discovered in a field near the village of Aunslev. According to a press release issued by the Ladby Viking Museum, where the cross is set to go on display, the artifact was found by a metal dectorist who immediately alerted archaeologists to the discovery. Made in the shape of a man with outstretched arms, the crucifix is just under two inches high and has a small eye on its top that suggests it was once worn with a chain. In the nineteenth century, a similar cross was discovered in the grave of Viking-era woman in Sweden, and researchers believe the Aunslev crucifix also probably belonged to a woman. Dating to the first half of the tenth century, it is one of the oldest crucifixes to be found in Denmark.

via Viking Crucifix Found in Denmark – Archaeology Magazine.

via The Archaeology News Network: Statues of Egyptian deities unearthed in Dakahlia.

Scans of King Tut’s Tomb Reveal New Evidence of Hidden Rooms

For at least 3,339 years, nobody has seen what lies behind the west and north walls of the burial chamber of Tutankhamun.  But this secret of three millennia might not last much longer.

On Thursday, Mamdouh Eldamaty, the Egyptian antiquities minister, held a press conference in Cairo to announce a tantalizing new piece of evidence:  Radar scans on those walls have revealed not only the presence of hidden chambers, but also unidentified objects that lie within these rooms. These objects, Eldamaty said, seem to be composed of both metal and organic materials.

via Scans of King Tut’s Tomb Reveal New Evidence of Hidden Rooms – The National Geographic.

For the first time in excavations of ancient Near Eastern sites: Winery found in Canaanite palace — ScienceDaily

For the first time in excavations of ancient Near Eastern sites, a winery has been discovered within a Canaanite palace. The winery produced high-quality wine that helped the Canaanite ruling family to impress their visitors — heads of important families, out-of-town guests, and envoys from neighboring states.

via For the first time in excavations of ancient Near Eastern sites: Winery found in Canaanite palace — ScienceDaily.

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