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The Ramblings of a Trainee Egyptologist

A masters student's journey through the world of Ancient Egypt, Ancient History and Academia.

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Archaeology News

Links to news updates in the field of archaeology.

via Rare rock inscriptions discovered near El-Khawy – HeritageDaily – Heritage & Archaeology News

via Ancient Graffiti on Egyptian Tomb Walls Studied – Archaeology Magazine

via Ancient DNA reveals role of Near East and Egypt in cat domestication – HeritageDaily – Heritage & Archaeology News

via Archaeologist teams up with computer vision experts to match prehistoric pottery – The Archaeology News Network

The foundations of a luxurious private bath house once owned by some of the richest citizens of Roman Chichester have been found under a public park in the centre of the city.

via Luxury bath house from Roman Chichester unearthed by archaeologists | UK news | The Guardian

4000-year-old red granite lintel discovered at Egypt’s Herakleopolis Magna – The Archaeology News Network

Dr. Mahmoud Afifi, Head of the Ancient Egyptian Antiquities Sector at the Ministry of Antiquities, who announced the discovery, said the lintel is engraved with two cartouches containing the name of the Middle Kingdom King Sesostris II, (ca. 1895 – 1889 BC), who built the Lahun pyramid located some 10km from Ihnasya.

via 4000-year-old red granite lintel discovered at Egypt’s Herakleopolis Magna – The Archaeology News Network

Cat Print Found on Roman Roof Tile in England – Archaeology Magazine

A cat’s paw print has been found on a piece of Roman roof tile dating to the first century A.D. in the East of England.

via Cat Print Found on Roman Roof Tile in England – Archaeology Magazine

Image credit to Cat Print Found on Roman Roof Tile in England – Archaeology Magazine

2,700-year-old Hittite stele turns out to be fake – The Archaeology News Network

“The fake stele was made by taking inspiration from the İvriz Rock Monuments. It was painted with a chemical substance to get a yellowish color like ancient stones,” the experts said in a statement.

via 2,700-year-old Hittite stele turns out to be fake – The Archaeology News Network

Life of Hittites to be ‘revived’ with village in Hattusha – The Archaeology News Network

“Our goal is to show how they lived. Our guests will also be able to find accommodation here in this big Hittite village. The architecture will be the same just like in the era. There will be a lion’s gate in the entrance, a king’s room, prison, bake shop, iron atelier and other things,” Boğazkale District Gov. Turan Soğukoluk said, noting that the village will help revive the lives of the Hittites 3,500 years ago.

via Life of Hittites to be ‘revived’ with village in Hattusha – The Archaeology News Network

Ancient stone block discovered at illegal excavation site in Upper Egypt’s Sohag – The Archaeology News Network

An Egyptian archaeological committee from Al-Belinna inspectorate in the Sohag town of Abydos found a stone block engraved with the cartouche of the 30th Dynasty King Nectanebo II during the inspection of an old house in the Beni Mansour area, under which the owner was carrying out an illegal excavation.

via Ancient stone block discovered at illegal excavation site in Upper Egypt’s Sohag – The Archaeology News Network

Image credit to The Ministry of Antiquities and found at Ancient stone block discovered at illegal excavation site in Upper Egypt’s Sohag – The Archaeology News Network

Embalming materials for Middle Kingdom High Vizier rediscovered on Luxor’s west bank – The Archaeology News Network

Within the framework of the Middle Kingdom Theban Project, an international mission under the auspices of the University of Alcalá (UAH, Spain) has uncovered over 50 clay jars filled with embalming materials for the mummification of the ancient Egyptian vizier Ipi during the cleaning of the courtyard under his tomb number (TT 315).

via Embalming materials for Middle Kingdom High Vizier rediscovered on Luxor’s west bank – The Archaeology News Network

German Archaeologists discover ancient Egyptian children’s feet impressions – Luxor Times

The Piramesse excavation team of the Roemer- and Pelizaeus-Museum in Hildesheim in Germany, has uncovered parts of a building complex as well as a mortar pit with children footprints and a painted wall in Piramesse ancient City (recently known as Qantir) in East Delta.

via German Archaeologists discover ancient Egyptian children’s feet impressions

Trove of statues of lion headed goddess Sekhmet found in Luxor – The Archaeology News Network

A team of German archaeologists have discovered 66 statues of the lion-headed goddess of war, Sekhmet, in an excavation of a temple near the Egyptian city of Luxor.

via Trove of statues of lion headed goddess Sekhmet found in Luxor – The Archaeology News Network

New discoveries in Egypt’s ancient Heliopolis – The Archaeology News Network

Egypt’s Minister of Antiquities Khaled El-Enany witnessed on Thursday the lifting of two newly discovered 19th dynasty royal statues from a pit at the Souq Al-Khamis district in the Al-Matariya area of greater Cairo.

via New discoveries in Egypt’s ancient Heliopolis – The Archaeology News Network

Compelling evidence for future tomb discoveries at Qubbet el-Hawa in Aswan – Past Horizons

Archaeologists from the University of Birmingham have found “compelling evidence” of new pharaonic tombs at Qubbet el-Hawa in Aswan, Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities has revealed.

via Compelling evidence for future tomb discoveries at Qubbet el-Hawa in Aswan – Past Horizons

New Kingdom Statues Unearthed in Cairo – Archaeology Magazine

Ahram Online reports that two statues were discovered by an Egyptian-German excavation team at the site of the Ramses II temple in the Al-Matariya area of Cairo. Mahmoud Afifi, of Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities, said the first statue is a limestone bust of King Seti II that measures about two and one-half feet tall. The second statue, which was found in pieces, was carved from quartzite and may have stood more than 25 feet tall. “Although there are no engravings that could identify such a statue, its existence at the entrance of King Ramses II’s temple suggests that it could belong to him,” Afifi said. Most of the temple’s colossal statues and obelisks are thought to have been taken to Alexandria and Europe in antiquity, while the blocks from the temple’s walls were reused during the Islamic period to construct buildings of Historic Cairo.

via New Kingdom Statues Unearthed in Cairo – Archaeology Magazine

Roman mosaic unearthed in wheat field in Central Turkey – The Archaeology News Network

A Roman-era mosaic, estimated to date back to the 2nd century, has been unearthed in Turkey’s Central Anatolian province of Kırıkkale’s Delice district.

The excavation field appeared last year after rainfall in a wheat field in the village of Elmalı and the 48-centimeter mosaic was discovered there.

via Roman mosaic unearthed in wheat field in Central Turkey – The Archaeology News Network

New discoveries in Byblos amid resort development – The Archaeology News Network

Wenamon had been sent by Egypt’s King Ramses XI on a mission to retrieve cedar wood to repair a sacred vessel. The negotiations were tense, and the Egyptian envoy was eventually forced to send home for more money to buy the wood. The Pharaohs had long relied on Lebanon’s then-plentiful forests for the building of their temples, furniture and ships. According to his account, Wenamon surveyed the logs of timber piled up on the Byblos shore ready for export, with 20 ships moored in the harbor.

Now, over 3,000 years later, contemporary Lebanese archaeologists have made new discoveries revealing the location of where exactly that harbor may be buried and the pivotal role of Byblos, one of the world’s oldest cities, in the ancient maritime supply chain.

via New discoveries in Byblos amid resort development – The Archaeology News Network

Database of Scotland’s ancient rock art to be created – The Archaeology News Network

About 6,000 rocks are known in Britain to have ancient cup and ring carvings. More than 2,000 of the sites are found in Scotland.

Historic Environment Scotland (HES) has been awarded £807,000 by the Arts and Humanities Research Council towards the five-year project.

The database would include 2D and 3D models of some of the decorated stone.

via Database of Scotland’s ancient rock art to be created – The Archaeology News Network

Archaeologists scan Reading garden for bones of King Henry I | Culture | The Guardian

Researchers look for tomb of William the Conqueror’s fourth son, whose remains are believed to have been buried in local abbey

via Archaeologists scan Reading garden for bones of King Henry I | Culture | The Guardian

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